For the Cold Season: Thai Bitter Melon and Green Mango Salad

This is part of a post I wrote about the importance of the bitter flavor during the autumn season. Autumn is an especially important time to imbibe the bitter taste (at least in Portland and other rainy places), due to its beneficial effect on drying dampness which can accumulate in the body as sinus drainage, mucous, head colds, and the flu. Bitter can help relieve coughing and wheezing, and it “purges fire to treat various infections accompanied by elevated body temperature.(15)” One must be cautious of taking too much bitter taste during a cold or fever, because it can “dry out” the body, weakening the tissues’ ability to be nourished. So bitter is a powerful ally; treat it with care, say hello often but for short periods of time, add a splash of bitters to your cocktail or your tea with honey, and it will serve you well as a loyal protector during the traditional flu season.

Bitter Melons, looking extra green and prickly! Via Cameron Maddux at flickr.

Bitter melon in particular helps fight infections and it has the added benefit of aiding in blood sugar stabilization. It is especially effective in treating all kinds of cysts, abscesses, skin problems and swellings, parasites, candida yeast overgrowth, and mucous of various types including that of the lungs and sinuses. Bitter melon tea is excellent for preventing colds, losing weight and improving digestion! I believe everyone would be using it if it tasted better, but there is no shortcut here… only small amounts of honey and the wonderful power of the human body to become accustomed to new experiences. Ironically, humans in paleolithic times ate a diet of primarily bitter foods, which is why we love sweet and salty so much today – salt and sugar were scarce so we needed to detect and gain pleasure from even tiny quantities of these tastes.

If you feel inspired to use bitter melon in the kitchen, here is one recipe that I can vouch for as a beginner in the realm of both cooking and in tolerating the bitter flavor. This salad is easy to make, and it really tones down the bitterness while balancing it with other flavors. This Thai dish is also rich with fruits and veggies that provide their own slew of health benefits for the flu season!

Ingredients for Green Mango Bitter Melon Salad Flavor Attack:

4 Baby Bok Choy, briefly wilted, drained, and shredded

1 Tbsp Safflower oil (or other high-heat cooking oil)

1/2 to 1 whole bitter melon (Chinese variety), halved, deseeded, and sliced thinly

1 Large or 2 Small Leeks, Sliced thinly

1 Hefty Cucumber, Julienned

1 Fresh Green Mango, Julienned (except for seed of course)

1/4 C Fresh Cilantro Leaves

Roasted Cashews for Garnish

Delicious green mangos! Via hozinja at flickr.

Dressing:

1 Tbsp Roasted Sesame Oil

2 Tbsp Fish Sauce

1/2 C Sweet Chili Sauce (Mae Ploy brand if possible)

1 Tbsp Fresh Lime Juice

Maybe a touch of rice vinegar or ponzu sauce to taste.

Prepare all ingredients.

1. Wash bok choy; throw into heated iron skillet (no oil) to steam in its own washing water for 1-2 min. Remove to colander; press out some of the remaining water, and shred or chop into large pieces.

2. In same iron skillet, pour the Tbsp Safflower Oil, let it heat to medium temp.  Add bitter melon slices and leek slices; saute until tender (3-5 min).

3. Whisk together the dressing ingredients in a small bowl.

4. In a large bowl, combine all of the vegetables except cilantro.  Toss with dressing.

***This can be refrigerated overnight to reduce the bitterness of the melon.  Giving the flavors time to meld increases its deliciousness!!!***

5. When ready to serve, chop cilantro and fold into salad.  Sprinkle cashews over top, and serve!  Enjoy with rice for a healthy meal.

Original recipe taken from Asian Kitchen Recipes. I have modified it slightly.

I’m always looking for more ways to cook with this and other bitter ingredients- please tell me below if you have had success with other recipes!

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